Great White Shark

Books, as I may have mentioned in the past, take a long time to take form. There are so many people involved, there are so many elements to consider. But it’s so fabulous when they finally get here. I have just received the rest of my author copies of Great White Shark and that means there is stock in the warehouse, ready to ship. Official release day is 14 August which is less than a month from today.

I can’t wait to share this book with readers. Cindy Lane‘s art is fabulous, beautiful and evocative. Our oceans are so magnificent and so important for we land-dwellers. Every ocean animal plays a role from the tiniest zooplankton to the enormous whales. Sharks are vitally important to the health of our oceans, and in the shark world, Great White Shark is the apex predator.

Sharks are awe-inspiring animals and endlessly fascinating. Did you know that great white sharks have roamed our oceans for many millions of years and their shape has changed very little.

Great White Shark is a new title in the Nature Storybook series from Walker Books Australia. You can see more titles in this series here

Mina and the Whole Wide World

Verse novels are having a bit of a moment and it’s lovely to see. I’ve long been a fan of this story form and of Sherryl Clark’s work. Poetry is often seen as a complex form, inaccessible to all but those who have the right decoding tools. While it is true that there traditional poetry can require some understanding of the tools to get the most from it, much of contemporary poetry is much simpler to read, much simpler to gain meaning from. It is no less skilled in the writing, but much easier to read. As with all writing, it’s the right words in the right order, and in the case of verse novels, its the right line breaks that make great stories.

‘Mina and the Whole Wide World’ introduces Mina who is super-excited about moving from the room she shares with her pesky younger brother into a room of her own. In her own room, she can keep her treasures safe from Georgie, she can dream about the world she will explore. Then Mum and Dad tell her that Azzami is coming to stay for a while – in her new room. And then they tell her that she is to watch out for him at school. Injustice upon injustice. And it’s not as if Azzami is helping at all – he hardly says a word. Slowly, Mina discovers Azzami’s story and her resentment melts away.

A wonderfully warm and empathetic story about family and refugees. ‘Mina and the Whole Wide World‘ with illustratons by Briony Stewart and published by UQP is perfect for newly independent readers.

A Clean Desk

… well, to be perfectly honest … a clean-ER desk.

… but nowhere near as clean as this one.

I’ve just submitted a picture book manuscript and now the waiting begins. This story nearly killed me! Dramatic? A touch, perhaps, but I found it very difficult to find the voice, the starting point and the ending. What DID I have? I had the ‘colour’. I had a single image that encapsulated the world I wanted to write about, but I really struggled to find my way in.

I read books. I watched videos. I researched online. But like a bubble of mercury, the idea kept slipping away from me, while also enticing me with shiny ‘what ifs?’.

I drafted. Redrafted. And so on. I think I had done ten complete drafts (well when I say complete, I mean not-quite-complete-but-exhausted-partials) when I decided to put the project away for a few days. I was not going to think about it. La-la-la fingers-in-ears not listening/thinking/trying. I was even beginning to entertain the idea that I should abandon this project altogether, even though I desparately wanted to do it.

And it worked.

Once I let it go, and stepped away, I found my answers. I found my voice. I won’t say the writing was easy from then on, but progress was steady and now it’s done. It’s out of my hands both literally and figuratively.

Hence the cleaner desk.

Now to decide which of the projects that were waiting in the wings to spend time with. Whichever way I go, I know my desk will soon return to its much more familiar messy state. And that’s okay. When I’m in the middle of a project, peripheral mess is somehow invisible.

That’s my excuse anyway.

Treasure!

Pirates and octopuses, parrots, hats and boats. Families and more pirates.

Today, I did a reading of Treasure in the beautiful Williamstown Botanic Gardens courtesy of their fabulous Friends group. There are so many corners and little nooks in these gardens that we were able to set up in the least windy spot. This is not to say that the wind didn’t find its way down paths and through garden beds, but it mostly waited until the end of my session.

Participants were encouraged to turn up dressed as pirates and that they did, one with a hook hand and another with both a parrot and an octopus! Such riches! We speculated what a pirate might look like and a few hardy souls donned jacket, stripy trews that I’d brought with me.

After the reading, we made hats and then, using the simple magic of paper folding, turned them into boats.

I told two new pirate jokes and I collected a few more.

Sail on Treasure!

The March of the Ants

There’s not always time to stop and think about why I do what I do. I suspect it’s the same for other book creators. And even if we did, would we be able to articulate it? I’m not sure. If pushed, I can say that I want to stimulate curiosity and wonder, as well as explore some of the amazing aspects of who we are and how we connect with our world.

But, it’s more than that, and for that I have fewer words. Which is why ‘The March of the Ants’ is such an interesting and compelling picture book. Authored by Australia’s current Children’s Laureate, Ursula Subosarsky and illustrated by Tohby Riddle and produced by the team at Book Trail Press, ‘The March of the Ants’ offers an explanation for, an exploration of, what stories and books are all about and why they are important.

The ants are off on an expedition. Each ant loads up with a tool, or some other element clearly essential for an expedition. The destination, if there is one, is not named. The leader scoffs at the suggestion that a book will be in anyway useful , but the littlest ant refuses to give it up and so, in the name of expediency, is allowed to bring it.

Every part of this book, from the golden sunshiney cover, to the marching ant textured endpapers is wonderful. Like all the best picture books, the text is deceptively simple, big ideas couched in accessible words. The industrious ants are expressive and the march through the valley of despair has so much to offer observant readers. Cooperation and teamwork are wonderful things, but we also need individuals who follow their own path and enrich us all.

Iceberg: the story of a real, live, in-the-flesh book launch.

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Organising booklaunches can be tricky at the best of times. Whatever time or date chosen, there are going to be calendar clashes, prior engagements, other priorities, venue restrictions. Add in a 5-day lockdown just as Melbourne was beginning to settle into new-normal and there was an extra level of challenge. Could it go ahead? How many could join us? How would we manage? It was Wednesday evening before we could be sure that the Saturday launch could happen. Wednesday was a day of phone calls and emails, text messages and not a little floor-pacing!

The wonderful Ella from Younger Sun Bookshop (with help from Kate and Pele) made sure it was hiccup-free. (Apart from two early attendees slipping in through a side door – yes, it was my parents!) Numbers were capped, attendee registration was required, as was hand-sanitising, masking and on-the-day registration. But, there was also a freshly-carved (as opposed to freshly-calved) iceberg, an iceberg cake, blue-and-white coconut ice, bergy bit meringues and some penguin-carrying fruit pieces!

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And there were people! Real people, in the same room, able to chat with each other. Safely distanced, waving-not-hugging people. It was so lovely to gather with friends and family and booklovers and share the celebrations for a new book. Judy Horacek did the honours, officially and fabulously welcomed Iceberg into the bookworld. Jess and I spoke a little about the making of this Iceberg, and there were quizzes with prizes.

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Just like it takes a big production team to make a book, there is a big support team of family and friends and others who make it possible to make books. Big thanks to them all. Sail on, Iceberg!

Did you know?

I’ve been back working on my wip today and I desperately wanted to include ‘swash’, but no matter how many times I rework the lines, it just won’t fit.

UPRUSH - Definition and synonyms of uprush in the English dictionary

The shallow wave wash that pushes up the beach after a wave breaks has a name! I knew that the pull back was called backwash, but I didn’t know that there was such a thing as ‘swash’. What a great word!

Waves

I’ve finally accepted that – wonderful word though it is – there’s no room for it in this for this story. I’m a bit disappointed but perhaps now the story can move forward.

And I’ll store ‘swash’ away for use another time.

Kookaburra Competition

**IT’S COMPETITION TIME!**

ATTENTION students, parents, teachers, librarians. It’s Kookaburra Competition time! Clear your desks and sharpen your tools. We have a writing competition AND an illustration competition. Submissions are invited from students for either or both competitions! Four entries (two writing, two illustration) will win a copy of ‘Kookaburra’. But wait, there’s more …

The class that submits the most entries will win a book prize pack from Walker Books Australia.

Competition opens 17 August. Competition closes 25 September.

Results will be posted here and on social media. Winners will receive their prize via Aust Post.

WRITING COMPETITION:

Many will be familiar with the rhyme/song, ‘Kookaburra Sits in the Old Gum Tree’. This popular song was written by Marion Sinclair in 1932. She wrote it for a competition and won! The rest, as they say, is history.

Here’s the original and one of the popular extra verses.

Kookaburra (the original)

Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree,
Merry merry king of the bush is he.
Laugh, Kookaburra, laugh, Kookaburra,
Gay your life must be!

Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree,
Eating all the gum drops he can see.
Stop Kookaburra, stop Kookaburra
Save some there for me!

And here’s a well-known extra verse NOT written by Marion Sinclair

Kookaburra sits on electric wire

jumping up and down his pants on fire

Ouch, kookaburra, ouch kookaburra

Hot your pants must be!

We’d like you to write a new verse for this song. Extra points for basing it on any page in ‘Kookaburra’.

Here’s an example for you:

Kookaburra sits in the tall gum tree,

eating all the spiders she can see.

Crunch, kookaburra! Munch, kookaburra!

Eat them all for me.

ILLUSTRATION COMPETITION

Download Tannya’s outline of a kookaburra. Make it simple, make it fancy. Make it beautiful! Use pencils, paints, collage or a mix of all of these to show us how much you love kookaburras. When you’re done, take a photo and email it to Tannya.

Where to send entries:

Send writing entries to Claire at clairesaxby@optusnet.com.au

Send illustration entries to Tannya at harricks@iinet.net.au

PLEASE NOTE: Include the following in your entry submission:

Your first name, your year level and the name of your school.

  1. Permission for us to post your entry on social media (yes or no)
  2. Permission for us to post your first name with your entry (yes or no)
  3. Permission for us to post the name of your school (yes or no)

*** You will be eligible for a prize, even if you say no to all these. We’d just like to share your wonderfulness. ***

Bring on the kookaburras. Kook-kook-kook! Kak-kak-kak!