Mina and the Whole Wide World

Verse novels are having a bit of a moment and it’s lovely to see. I’ve long been a fan of this story form and of Sherryl Clark’s work. Poetry is often seen as a complex form, inaccessible to all but those who have the right decoding tools. While it is true that there traditional poetry can require some understanding of the tools to get the most from it, much of contemporary poetry is much simpler to read, much simpler to gain meaning from. It is no less skilled in the writing, but much easier to read. As with all writing, it’s the right words in the right order, and in the case of verse novels, its the right line breaks that make great stories.

‘Mina and the Whole Wide World’ introduces Mina who is super-excited about moving from the room she shares with her pesky younger brother into a room of her own. In her own room, she can keep her treasures safe from Georgie, she can dream about the world she will explore. Then Mum and Dad tell her that Azzami is coming to stay for a while – in her new room. And then they tell her that she is to watch out for him at school. Injustice upon injustice. And it’s not as if Azzami is helping at all – he hardly says a word. Slowly, Mina discovers Azzami’s story and her resentment melts away.

A wonderfully warm and empathetic story about family and refugees. ‘Mina and the Whole Wide World‘ with illustratons by Briony Stewart and published by UQP is perfect for newly independent readers.

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