The March of the Ants

There’s not always time to stop and think about why I do what I do. I suspect it’s the same for other book creators. And even if we did, would we be able to articulate it? I’m not sure. If pushed, I can say that I want to stimulate curiosity and wonder, as well as explore some of the amazing aspects of who we are and how we connect with our world.

But, it’s more than that, and for that I have fewer words. Which is why ‘The March of the Ants’ is such an interesting and compelling picture book. Authored by Australia’s current Children’s Laureate, Ursula Subosarsky and illustrated by Tohby Riddle and produced by the team at Book Trail Press, ‘The March of the Ants’ offers an explanation for, an exploration of, what stories and books are all about and why they are important.

The ants are off on an expedition. Each ant loads up with a tool, or some other element clearly essential for an expedition. The destination, if there is one, is not named. The leader scoffs at the suggestion that a book will be in anyway useful , but the littlest ant refuses to give it up and so, in the name of expediency, is allowed to bring it.

Every part of this book, from the golden sunshiney cover, to the marching ant textured endpapers is wonderful. Like all the best picture books, the text is deceptively simple, big ideas couched in accessible words. The industrious ants are expressive and the march through the valley of despair has so much to offer observant readers. Cooperation and teamwork are wonderful things, but we also need individuals who follow their own path and enrich us all.

Iceberg: the story of a real, live, in-the-flesh book launch.

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Organising booklaunches can be tricky at the best of times. Whatever time or date chosen, there are going to be calendar clashes, prior engagements, other priorities, venue restrictions. Add in a 5-day lockdown just as Melbourne was beginning to settle into new-normal and there was an extra level of challenge. Could it go ahead? How many could join us? How would we manage? It was Wednesday evening before we could be sure that the Saturday launch could happen. Wednesday was a day of phone calls and emails, text messages and not a little floor-pacing!

The wonderful Ella from Younger Sun Bookshop (with help from Kate and Pele) made sure it was hiccup-free. (Apart from two early attendees slipping in through a side door – yes, it was my parents!) Numbers were capped, attendee registration was required, as was hand-sanitising, masking and on-the-day registration. But, there was also a freshly-carved (as opposed to freshly-calved) iceberg, an iceberg cake, blue-and-white coconut ice, bergy bit meringues and some penguin-carrying fruit pieces!

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And there were people! Real people, in the same room, able to chat with each other. Safely distanced, waving-not-hugging people. It was so lovely to gather with friends and family and booklovers and share the celebrations for a new book. Judy Horacek did the honours, officially and fabulously welcomed Iceberg into the bookworld. Jess and I spoke a little about the making of this Iceberg, and there were quizzes with prizes.

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Just like it takes a big production team to make a book, there is a big support team of family and friends and others who make it possible to make books. Big thanks to them all. Sail on, Iceberg!